Plusnet IPv6 still delayed, so let’s go spelunking in a Hurricane Electric tunnel

When I last changed ISP (last year, when Sky bought my old ISP, BE Unlimited) one of my requirements was for my new ISP to have a roadmap for making IPv6 available. I’ve been waiting (impatiently) for my new ISP, Plusnet, to deliver on their initial “coming soon” statements. Sadly, like almost all ISPs, Plusnet are not moving quickly with IPv6, and are still investigating alternatives like carrier grade NAT to extend the life of IPv4. I can sympathise with this position – IPv6 has limited device support, most of their customers are not ready to adopt it, and trying to provide support for the necessary dual-stack environment would not be easy. But, the problem of IPv4 address exhaustion is not going away.

So at the end of last year they started their second controlled trial of IPv6. I was keen to join, but the conditions were onerous. I would get a second account, I would need to provide my own IPv6-capable router, I couldn’t have my existing IPv4 static IP address, I couldn’t have Reverse DNS on the line, and I had to commit to providing feedback on my “normal” workload. So much as I wanted to join the trial, I couldn’t, as I wouldn’t be able to run my mailserver.

So I decided to investigate alternatives until such time as Plusnet get native IPv6 support working. The default solution in cases like mine, where my ISP only provides me with an IPv4 connection, is to tunnel IPv6 conversations through my IPv4 connection, to an ISP who does provide IPv6 connectivity to the Internet. There are two major players in this area for home users, SisXS and Hurricane Electric. Both provide all the basic functionality, as well as each having some individual specialist features. I’m just looking for a basic IPv6 connection and could use either, but in the end Hurricane Electric appeared vastly easier to register with, so I went with them.

My current internet connection is FTTC (fibre to the cabinet) via a BT OpenReach VDSL2 modem and my ISP-supplied (cheap and nasty) combined broadband router, NAT and firewall. This gives me a private 16bit IPv4 address space, for which my home server (a low-power mini-ITX system that runs 24×7) provides all the network management functions, such as DHCP and DNS.

What I want to add to this is a protocol-41 tunnel from the IPv6 ISP (Hurricane Electric, or HE) back through my NAT & Firewall to my home server. By registering for such a tunnel, HE provide (for free) a personal /64 subnet to me through that tunnel, allowing me to use my home server to provision IPv6 addresses to all the devices on my LAN. However, this connection is neither NAT’ed nor firewalled. The IPv6 addresses are both globally addressable and visible. So I also want my home server to act as a firewall for all IPv6 communications through that tunnel, to protect the devices on my network, without forcing them to all adopt their own firewalls. I was initially concerned that because my home server also acts as an OpenVPN endpoint, and so uses a bridged network configuration, getting the tunnel working might be quite awkward, but it turns out to make very little difference to the solution.

So, to make this work, first you need a static IPv4 address on the internet, and to have ensured that your router will respond to ICMP requests (pings!). Then you can register with Hurricane Electric, and “Create a Regular Tunnel”, which will result in a page of information describing your tunnel. I printed this for future reference (and in case I broke my network while making changes) but you can always access this information from the HE website.

You now need to edit /etc/network/interfaces. Add lines to define the tunnel, as follows, substituting the values from your tunnel description:

# Define 6in4 ipv6 tunnel to Hurricane Electric
auto he-ipv6
iface he-ipv6 inet6 v4tunnel
address [your "Client IPv6 Address"]
netmask 64
endpoint [your "Server IPv4 Address"]
ttl 255

up ip -6 route add default dev he-ipv6
down ip -6 route del default dev he-ipv6

Now add an address from your “Routed /64 IPv6 Prefix” to the appropriate interface – in my case, this is the bridge interface br0, but its more likely to be eth0 for you. This defines your servers static, globally accessible IPv6 address:

# Add an IPv6 address from the routed prefix to the br0 interface.
iface br0 inet6 static
address [any IPv6 address from the Routed /64 IPv6 Prefix]
netmask 64

Since I am running Ubuntu 12.04 I now need to install radvd, which will advertise the IPv6 subnet to any systems on our network that want to configure themselves an IPv6 connection. Think of it as a sort of DHCP for IPv6. However, when I move to 14.04 sometime later this year I expect to be able to get rid of radvd, and replace it with dnsamsq (which I already use for IPv4 DNS/DHCP), as the latest version of dnsmasq is reported to provide a superset of the radvd capabilities.

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install radvd

Then configure radvd to give out IPv6 addresses from our Routed /64 IPv6 Prefix, by creating the file /etc/radvd.conf, and entering the following into it:

interface [your interface, probably eth0]
{
AdvSendAdvert on;
AdvLinkMTU 1480;
prefix [Your Routed /64 IPv6 Prefix, incl the /64]
{
AdvOnLink on;
AdvAutonomous on;
};
};

Any IPv6-capable devices will now ask for (and be allocated) an IPv6 address in your Routed /64 subnet, based on the MAC address of the interface that is requesting the IPv6 address.
Now uncomment the line:

# net.ipv6.conf.all.forwarding=1

from the file /etc/sysctl.conf. This will allow your server to act as a router for IPv6 traffic.

Now we need to enable and then configure the firewall. I take no credit for this, as much of the information related to the firewall was gleaned from this post. As I run Ubuntu Server I’ll use ufw, the Ubuntu Firewall utility to configure the underlying ipchains firewall. Alternative front-ends to ipchains will work equally well, though the actual method of configuration will obviously differ. First I needed to enable the firewall for IPv6 by editing /etc/default/ufw, and ensuring the following options are set correctly:

# Set to yes to apply rules to support IPv6 (no means only IPv6 on loopback
# accepted). You will need to 'disable' and then 'enable' the firewall for
# the changes to take affect.
IPV6=yes

and

# Set the default forward policy to ACCEPT, DROP or REJECT. Please note that
# if you change this you will most likely want to adjust your rules
DEFAULT_FORWARD_POLICY="ACCEPT"

Now we need to enable the firewall (by default it’s disabled) and add some additional rules to it:

# Enable the firewall
sudo ufw enable
# Allow everything on my LAN to connect to anything
sudo ufw allow from 192.168.0.0/16
# Allow Protocol-41 connections from the Tunnel Endpoint Server (to run the tunnel)
sudo ufw allow from [Your "Server IPv4 Address"] proto ipv6
# Allow BOOTP service on port 67 from radvd
sudo ufw allow proto any to any port 67
# Allow my IPv6 addresses to access services on this server
sudo ufw allow from [Your "Routed /64 IPv6 Prefix" including the "/64"]

I also had to add a few more rules to cope with the external facing services that my home server provides to the Internet (mail, web, ssh, ftp, vpn etc).

Finally I want to prevent all but a few specific types of external IPv6 connection to be made inbound into my network. To do this, edit the file /etc/ufw/before6.rules, and add the following lines directly BEFORE the “COMMIT” statement at the end of the file:


# Forward IPv6 packets associated with an established connection
-A ufw6-before-forward -i he-ipv6 -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT

# Allow "No Next Header" to be forwarded or proto=59
# See http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1883.txt (not sure if the length
# is needed as all IPv6 headers should be that size anyway).
-A ufw6-before-forward -p ipv6-nonxt -m length --length 40 -j ACCEPT

# allow MULTICAST to be forwarded
# These 2 need to be open to enable Auto-Discovery.
-A ufw6-before-forward -p icmpv6 -s ff00::/8 -j ACCEPT
-A ufw6-before-forward -p icmpv6 -d ff00::/8 -j ACCEPT

# ok icmp codes to forward
-A ufw6-before-forward -p icmpv6 --icmpv6-type destination-unreachable -j ACCEPT
-A ufw6-before-forward -p icmpv6 --icmpv6-type packet-too-big -j ACCEPT
-A ufw6-before-forward -p icmpv6 --icmpv6-type time-exceeded -j ACCEPT
-A ufw6-before-forward -p icmpv6 --icmpv6-type parameter-problem -j ACCEPT
-A ufw6-before-forward -p icmpv6 --icmpv6-type echo-request -j ACCEPT
-A ufw6-before-forward -p icmpv6 --icmpv6-type echo-reply -j ACCEPT

# Don't forward any other packets to hosts behind this router.
-A ufw6-before-forward -i he-ipv6 -j ufw6-logging-deny
-A ufw6-before-forward -i he-ipv6 -j DROP

At this point I saved everything and rebooted (though you could just bring up the he-ipv6 interface) and everything came up correctly. I was able to test that I had a valid Global scope IPv6 address associated with (in my case) my br0 interface, and that I could successfully ping6 -c 5 ipv6.google.com via it. I was also able to check that my laptop had automatically found and configured a valid Global scope IPv6 address for it’s eth0 interface, and that it could ping6 my home server and external IPv6 sites, and that it was possible to browse IPv6-only websites from it.

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5 thoughts on “Plusnet IPv6 still delayed, so let’s go spelunking in a Hurricane Electric tunnel

  1. To be honest I have been waiting for the same thing but in the end I have voted with my feet: 2 weeks ago I decided I would migrate away from PlusNet to AAISP.co.uk and one of the reasons for that shift was the IPv6 issue.

    It is now one week that I am with AAISP. My network has been fully IPv6 enabled since the migration and, to be honest, it works a charm.
    I have also been surprised by the fact that 33% of my traffic (over the week) has been using IPv6. It shows there are quite a few IPv6 servers out there (Google being clearly the elephant in the room admittedly).

    Yes, AAISP is more expensive. But being able to talk to people who know their subject and having thing just works is worthwhile to me. And admittedly, it did save me from spending too much time toying with IPv6 tunnels 😉

    • At the moment I’m happy enough with the tunnel approach. However, there have been some unexpected results from implementing it – the most noticeable being that (since Linux prioritises IPv6 over IPv4) I too am flowing a lot of IPv6 traffic over the tunnel, which significantly degrades the performance of my internet connection. But in addition my mailserver, my printer, and a bunch of other internal services have all suddenly switched to IPv6, which (without additional configuration!) doesn’t always work as well as I would like. I can undoubtedly resolve this with a bit more work, but in the meantime the simple fix has been to reprioritise my Linux systems so they use IPv4 by choice. It’s a one line change in the file /etc/gai.conf. The comments explain the change that is needed.
      Best of both worlds!

  2. Ok, thanks for the tip (although I am not going to apply it for the moment as I haven’t seen a single issue so far. Even network performance has stayed the same in my case. But it could come handy, so thanks again).

    • As far as I can tell though, PlusNet still don’t support native IPv6, even if your router does.

      However, I do agree with your choice of router – I’m now running OpenWRT firmware on a TP-Link WDR 4300. I’ve expanded the storage on that with a 2GB USB key & Extroot which gives me a massive amount of storage for adding additional function. For example, the router itself now hosts my Hurricane Electric tunnel, my MQTT broker, and more.

      The only shortcoming I’ve found so far is that I am unable to run node.js on it, as these routers run on a big-endian MIPS processor, and Googles V8 Javascript engine (on which node.js is layered) doesn’t support MIPSbe.

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